May mountain flowers and the Noon Gun


- gardening for biodiversity
in Cape Town, South Africa


On Elsie's Peak dangly Erica coccinea. Pink bells Erica viscaria. One sided Erica nudiflora. White Erica ericoides?

Grey fronds Syncarpha gnaphaloides. White Olea capensis. Cottonwool Tarchonanthus littoralis. Macrostylis villosa long styles.

No ID grass. Spiral of Oedera imbricata leaves. Leucadendron xanthoconus cone. Brunia noduliflora silver filigree buttons.

Yellow Euryops abrotanifolius. Yellow stars Gnidia juniperifolia. Pink and yellow sparkly stars Struthiola ciliata. Burgundy feathering Pelargonium myrrifolium.

Elsie's Peak May flowers
Elsie's Peak May flowers

At Redhill Othonna quinquedentata is growing on me. The flowers dance in a yellow haze above their neighbours (as Gaura does). The five toothed leaves make it gardenworthy out of flower too.

Othonna quinquedentata
Othonna quinquedentata

Again Redhill. Pink on white stars Trichocephalus stipularis. Understated euphorbia Clutia alaternoides. Anaxeton laeve pink bud 'strawberries" - and white flowers, a tiniest bunch of roses - bare stalks where Metalasia has leaves.

Eroded rock exposed by the empty Silvermine dam. Yellows. Osteospermum polygaloides. Russet bud Ursinia tenuifolia. Prickly Cullumia setosa.

Salt and pepper Erica imbricata. Dangly Erica plunkenetii. Pink cupped in burgundy Erica glabella. Little Lachenalia rubida.

Oxalis luteola yellow flower - bud and leaves. Oxalis punctata in pink - and white.

Redhill May flowers
Redhill May flowers

On Devil's Peak the Ungardener 'stands' on Table Mountain above Cape Town.

Devil's Peak and Table Mountain
Devil's Peak and Table Mountain

At Spitskop bunny ears grass. Yellow Senecio burchellii. Blue cup Roella ciliata.
Oxalis eckloniana with a long tube in puce.

Sky blue Salvia chamelaeagnea. Lime gold Leucadendron salignum.
Nectar thieves were at Erica mammosa. Pink and silver Indigofera cytisoides.

Eroded I see You rock. Creamy Phylica buxifolia. White fireworks Staavia radiata
Pelargonium myrrifolium.

Spider on her web. Black bearded Protea lepidocarpodendron. Wild Protea cynaroides. Protea repens in pink.

Spitskop May flowers
Spitskop May flowers

Along Silvermine River mauve Oftia africana flowers - toothed leaves. Yellow Microdon dubius and Bulbine praemorsa.

Purple and white Metalasia divergens. Milkweed architecture Gomphocarpus cancellatus. Silvermine in drizzle. White Maytenus oleiodes.

Lobelia pinifolia (caught in focus at last!) White feathers Searsia tomentosa.
Protea repens in white. Australian tea tree invading Silvermine!

May flowers along Silvermine River
May flowers along Silvermine River

Helichrysum cymosum growing along the river. A bit disconcerted to see the 'groundcover' I planted under the lemon tree, is less mat and more shrublet. Silver leaves and knots of golden flowers.

 Helichrysum cymosum
Helichrysum cymosum

Despite being a born and bred Capetonian, I have never got used to the Noon Gun. I never worked in the City. I wonder how many tourists are startled in the midst of a busy day, to hear a cannon fired and see a cloud of smoke above Signal Hill. The Gun is the Signal. His hikers had to sprint to get there in time to be blown away!

The Noon Gun on Signal Hill
The Noon Gun on Signal Hill

From Redhill towards Scarborough Erica ericoides gone gloriously to baked terracotta seeds - across the valley and up the slope, not as I first thought burnt reminders of the previous fire. Against lime Leucadendron laureolum. First Mimetes fimbrifolius.

Asparagus capensis for bees. Scarlet Gladiolus merianellus bonaspei (= Good Hope). Agathosma lanceolata flowers - seeds.

Silver and mauve Podalyria sericea. Mauve button Othonna digitata. Dark tipped Erica corifolia. Groundcover Euphorbia tuberosa.

Redhill towards Scarborough May flowers
Redhill towards Scarborough May flowers

We both saw Gladiolus maculata. He as he climbed up Wolfkop to the Fat Lady Shelter. Next day our fynbos ramble found each plant was a slightly different colour - chocolate, peach, lemon or raspberry!

Gladiolus maculata
Gladiolus maculata

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Pictures by Diana and Jürg Studer

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Comments

  1. The photos from your hikes never disappoint. I've never tried to grow Erica here but perhaps I should.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I confess I battle to grow ericas. Each one need particular conditions - but Hoover Boo is successful!

      Delete
  2. Gladiolus maculata is very interesting; I don't remember seeing it before. Do you think the colour differences are due to conditions or just natural variety?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The natural variation from which horticulture can source 'new varieties'. Even those growing near each other varied.

      Delete
  3. The sheer number of gorgeous plants native to your country continues to astound me. I will come back to this post again and again, to admire and be amazed. Brunia noduliflora! OMG!!

    My own little SA Erica is growing well--I'm excited that it might survive here--if it can get through the summer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Birds and their flowers we have in common.

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  4. Stunning flowers and a strange tradition :-)

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  5. An amazing array of blooms, Diana. I miss the ericas from my native land where heathers and heaths were part of my childhood, growing freely on the surrounding hills. Here I've had no luck with them. P. x

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  6. Astonishing number of wildflowers, never seen anything like it. The Noon Gun does sound rather startling.

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  7. It always takes me forever to read your posts because all of the blooms are new to me and very enjoyable.

    As for the noon gun - what a great tradition! I am sure everyone checks their watches to make sure they are running correctly.

    Jeannie @ GetMeToTheCountry

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  8. What an usual tradition. And what lovely blooms!
    Amalia
    xo

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  9. Well wow, wow again, always you make me say Wow! xxx

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  10. Beautiful! So many flowers! I do love those gladiolus, too. Erica don't grow well here. It's too warm and humid. It's always inspiring to see plants growing in such difficult areas.

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  11. Your images are always so good looking, picture perfect .

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