July flowers from Chapman's Peak to Elsie's Peak

- gardening for biodiversity
in Cape Town, South Africa

Hiking among wildflowers
in the mountains
around Cape Town

From Kalk Bay Peak he looked across False Bay waves for Muizenberg surfers. Snow dusts the tops of the distant Du Toit's Kloof mountains.

From Kalk Bay Peak to snow on the mountains
From Kalk Bay Peak to snow on the mountains

On Brakkloofrand
Yellow Cullumia setosa. Othonna filicaulis has heart-shaped leaves. Polyarrhena stricta (or Felicia echinata??)

White Crassula capensis fragile flowers for a succulent. Knowltonia capensis (anemone family)

Fluffy seeds Tarchonanthus littoralis. White Aspalathus forbesii pea flower. Oxalis polyphylla with thread leaves. Glowing red new leaves Cassine peragua.

Pink Erica plukenetii dangly bits. Flared out Erica abietina atrorosea. Erica glabella softest pink with burgundy stamens. Beard of Protea lepidocarpodendron.

July flowers at Brakkloofrand
July flowers at Brakkloofrand

From Chapman's Peak his Atlantic Ocean view reaches from Slangkop lighthouse to Hout Bay with subsistence fisherman and affluent gated communities.

Chapman's Peak to Slangkop lighthouse
Chapman's Peak to Slangkop lighthouse

Chapman's Peak to Hout Bay
Chapman's Peak to Hout Bay

At Blackhill
Softest blue Gladiolus gracilis. Red Babiana ringens has a built in perch for sunbirds (which don't hover like hummingbirds). Central white star distinguishes Babiana villosula. Ethereal Ornithoglossum viride is the plant for which Slangkop is named.

Second set of elaborate blue and white markings on Roella ciliata (bellflower family). Down to Wurmbea hiemalis in burgundy and cream (crocus family). Lobostemon glaucophyllus (forget-me-not family) has the pink and blue flowers I love. This time my camera caught the tiniest details within an orchid Disperis capensis.

Silver leaves and soft purple pea flowers on Podalyria sericea. Dianthus albens (more purple than white!) Dusky pink Protea repens bud will fill with nectar. Fluffy pink Stilbe ericoides (fynbos endemic family).

Dangling yellow Stylapterus fruticulosus (Penaea fynbos endemic family). Red and yellow furled Hermannia rudis (Hibiscus family). Hungry caterpillar enjoying fresh green leaves. Oxalis lanata named for its softly furred leaves (only 120 fynbos species to learn!)

Blackhill July flowers
Blackhill July flowers

Stemless Protea acaulos. One lonely plant bearing flowers from tight bud, to unfolding perfection then fading.

Protea acaulos at Blackhill in July
Protea acaulos at Blackhill in July

Up on Grootkop above Camps Bay he found Anemone tenuifolia.

Anemone tenuifolia above Camps Bay in July
Anemone tenuifolia above Camps Bay in July

On Steenberg
Yellow Bolusafra bituminosa for the tarry scented leaves (pea family). Lime gold stars of Leucadendron laureolum. A haze of Euryops abrotanifolius (leaves like southernwood) against the sun. This one mystified me, but it is Aspalathus capitata (pea family) gone to seed with wisps of brown petals.

Salmon Watsonia tabularis confined to rocky sandstone slopes on the Cape Peninsula. Again silver leaves and purple pea flowers, but Podalyia calyptrata is a tree. Prickly Muraltia heisteria (Polygala family). Not Felicia, but Zyrphelis taxifolia (11 of the 13 species in the South-western Cape)

Pink pea Amphithalea ericifolia (42 species all fynbos). Microdon dubius (Scrophulariaceae) a dark form. Metalasia divergens. Osmitopsis astericoides grows in marshes.

Erica lutea with long cream tubes. Round pink 'berries' Erica baccans. Furled white petals and chocolate stamens Erica calycina. Fluffy pink Erica hirtiflora.

Wildflowers at Steenberg in July
Wildflowers at Steenberg in July

Anaxeton laeve has startling strawberry buds opening to plain white flowers borne high on long stalks.

Anaxeton laeve at Steenberg in July
Anaxeton laeve at Steenberg in July

Cape Mountains for Curious and Adventurous hiked UP Elsie's Peak, Fynbos Ramblers walked for wildflowers.
Third version of blue and white markings Lobelia coronopifolia. Pink and blue Lobostemon is fruticosus. Polygala myrtifolia with its white tassel. Nemesia affinis with inner and outer versions of delicate purple veins.

Staavia radiata (Brunia family) pink hearts and bright white petals. Cherry lines on Adenandra villosa (citrus! family) petals. Thesium viridifolium (sandalwood family) has toothed margins on white petals (an Edelweiss echo). Lemon and wine Pelargonium triste.

Down to turquoisy Euphorbia tuberosa. Burgundy feathering on an Oxalis luteola bud. Muted green lines outside Moraea collina petals. Serruria glomerata bud.

Capelio tabularis sturdy grey leaves rewarded us with tall and substantial yellow flowers. Protea lepidocarpodendron bearded protea. Leucadendron salignum male flowers.

Elsie's Peak July flowers
Elsie's Peak July flowers


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Pictures by Diana and Jürg Studer

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Comments

  1. The range of wildflowers in your area is truly incredible. While I recognize some, most are entirely foreign to me. The views from the peaks are magnificent. I see there's no drought report this month - I hope that means that the situation has improved.

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    Replies
    1. I'll get back to drought and rain in the next post about our garden. It is looking hopeful, if we get more rain till the end of September.

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  2. Lovely wildflowers especially considering it is winter. The views from Chapman’s Peak to Hout Bay are magnificent ... brings back memories for me..

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  3. There are so many beautiful native flowers around you; no wonder so many find there way into English gardens as exotic imports. The one that caught my eye today is Softest blue Gladiolus gracilis, I don't think I've ever seen a more beautiful gladiolus.

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    Replies
    1. We had a wild one in our first Camps Bay garden. I regret that I didn't pot it.

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  4. Wow, the list of wildflowers is incredible, but the views would give Scotland a run for its money.

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  5. Wildflowers, wildflowers, and more wildflowers! And in so many bright and cheery colors! And your opening wide view vignette is incredible!

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  6. Your wildflower pictures take my breath away! Your views are amazing! P. x

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  7. By now You probably have enough photos to make your own wildflower encyclopedia!?

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    Replies
    1. Now we have hiked thru a full year, it will be interesting to compare months.

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  8. So many species to learn, indeed! I like the caterpillar.

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  9. What a fascinating variety of wildflowers! I envy your hikes amid such fabulous scenery!

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  10. Oh my dear friend Diana,
    the part of the world you are living in is filled with beauty. It's a rich horn of plenty reagion and I always learn lots of new flowers. So my raised bed is filled in layers starting with small branches, compost and so on.
    Thank you so much for your lovely visit.
    All my best and a big big hug
    Elisabeth

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