False Bay garden in September

by Diana Studer
- gardening for biodiversity
in Cape Town, South Africa

We were away for three weeks in September. Lots of flowers to enjoy, and LOTS of pruning and chipping to catch up with. This time it is the pink and white prettiness of Spring Promise that glows for Through the Garden Gate with Sarah in Dorset.

Tillandsia flowers are actually the very bluest flowers in my garden now - but I count them as pink, draped over branches in the shade. I have achieved the honey-scented touched with purple Buddleja salviifolia flowers. Even a sprig in a vase scents the room deliciously! Delicate mauve wild hibiscus from Knysna reminds me of my middle sister Margie. Pink Syncarpha buds open to white flowers, the tips of the petals still hinting at pink. Veltheimia I moved to shade has given me a row of flowers, mostly faded.

Pink flowers in September for Spring Promise
Pink flowers in September for Spring Promise
For Wildflower Wednesday with Gail at Clay and Limestone in Tennessee. Ivy leaved pelargoniums prefer some shade, or desperate TLC with heavy watering. Keeping the Tillandsia and Veltheimia company on the shady side are two pelargoniums. Pelargonium cordifolium Valentine has dark heart-shaped leaves and pink flowers that sparkle with silver when they catch the sunshine. Soft velvety minty leaves with ethereal pale flowers that dance on tall stalks above the leaves - if you are a more intensive gardener than I; you can plant shady Pelargonium tomentosum beneath a sunny species and enjoy two layers of flowers (which I saw at Elgin open gardens years ago).

Pink pelargoniums that prefer some shade, in September
Pink pelargoniums that prefer some shade, in September

Pelargoniums on the sunny side. Delicate white flowers and nutmeg scented kidney-shaped grey leaves Pelargonium x fragrans. Sharply pointed citrus scented leaves, with purple flashes on pink flowers. Dark veined leaves. Soft pink and velvety rose scented leaves. Loud pink commonorgarden ex hortorum.

Sunny pink pelargoniums in September
Sunny pink pelargoniums in September

Out front Euphorbia mauritanica goes from lime green buds to coppery flowers. A band of red pelargoniums weaves along. In a pot a very dark nasturtium from my oldest sister. Spilling over the low terrace are Californian poppies.

Orange and red flowers for September
Orange and red flowers for September

On the trellis outside the kitchen Senecio macroglossus is covered in buttery yellow flowers. The leaves are ivy shaped but succulent. Yellow Senecio and Clivia are both being chewed.

September's yellow flowers with Senecio macroglossus
September's yellow flowers
with Senecio macroglossus

For my blue I have a few Scabiosa flowers (must think about adding something else to the mix) White pelargoniums flower all along that wall. Melianthus has flowers for nectar loving sunbirds, and some elaborate green seeds. Tuberous begonia is enjoying its new pot and has a tall stalk of coral pink flowers. Japanese maple has fresh leaves, until the Southeaster shreds them - that is one plant that doesn't approve of the climate here.

Hoping for blue and white flowers in September
Hoping for blue and white flowers in September

While we were away next door put up a trampoline for their little girl. I will be watering my Kiggelaria africana, Pavetta lanceolata, Dovyalis caffra and three Searsia. Our little trees need to grow to fill the gap in the once was a nice hedge.

Trampoline next door
Trampoline next door

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Pictures by Diana and Jürg Studer

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Comments

  1. Three weeks away from your garden is a long time! It must have be wonderful to return and find some flowers emerging for spring. I love your pink flowers. You have a wonderful collection of Pelargoniums, some I recognise from my garden. When are they at their best? I assume they flower all year round with you. Sarah x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We seem to have had enough rain in September to encourage them (but not quite enough for dams sadly)

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    2. It’s lovely to have flowers remind us of family, your garden is beautiful. I can imagine you had lots to do after being away for three weeks! That trampoline will be fun for their daughter!

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  2. Your spring garden is spectacular, Diana! I don't think I've ever seen a Tillandsia with flowers that pretty. I'm envious of the Buddleja and your gorgeous collection of Pelargoniums too.

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  3. Beautiful signs of Spring in your garden Diana. I guess it's your favourite time of the year, before the intense heat arrives.

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  4. Your Pelargoniums and Nasturtiums are flourishing even though you have been away. I can never get Californian Poppies to grow, despite the fact that they grow along the side of the road in the countryside here. All of your spring flowers are looking healthy and happy! What a pity the Japanese Maple does not like the Southeaster because their leaves are very pretty.
    I hope you can enjoy more trips with your Electric car.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My Californian poppies thrive on neglect. Inherited from the previous gardener - the the russet to ivory hues, have whittled down to orange and yellow.

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  5. Your garden is a real joy....as good as any Botanical garden. You have a wonderful collection, and really know how to care for them so that they thrive.

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  6. Your collection of pelargoniums is amazing, but I am captivated by the succulent, but ivy-like, Senecio macroglossus. You have really developed your garden since you moved to your new home on False Bay. It is so lush and filled with a great variety of beautiful, interesting plants. Well-done!

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