Spring flowers from Rondebosch Common and Smitswinkel Bay

- gardening for biodiversity
in Cape Town, South Africa

Hiking among wildflowers
and in the mountains
around Cape Town

A drizzly day as we walked on Rondebosch Common. Delighted to see the reintroduced Moraea aristata blooming. The last surviving population is at the Observatory among some unmown grass. Seeds were harvested and a suitable new home ... Rondebosch Common ... was found. In 2017 corms from the Observatory seeds were planted. In 2018 more from Kew's Millennium Seed Project. The flowers are being pollinated by monkey beetles, and setting seed. After 3 years of seed setting we can count the new population as established. Thanks to Alex Lansdowne plant conservation and restoration horticulture.

Moraea aristata September
Moraea aristata
September

From bud to flower Moraea gawleri is an unusual coral amongst blue, yellow and white moraeas.

Moraea gawleri September
Moraea gawleri
September

With help from iNaturalist these tiniest white stars are Dischisma capitatum.

Dischisma capitatum September
Dischisma capitatum
September

Pelargonium triste range of colours enchanting me as they did last October.

Podalyria sericea fragrant sweetpea flowers, with silver pods to match its leaves. Satyrium odorum (orchid). Purple Babiana fragrans.

Lachenalia unifolia with zebra striped leaf base. Mocha stripes on Drimia filifolia. Up close gold and orange swirled on Hermannia multiflora.

Rondebosch Common flowers in September
Rondebosch Common in September

In September we still had rain and waterfalls as he hiked the Kirstenbosch Contour Path.

Kirstenbosch Contour Path
Kirstenbosch Contour Path

Blackhill Koppies he won't forget! One woman slipped - she is recovering, walking wounded. In the centre of the wide view is the Glencairn Labyrinth.

Blackhill Koppies
Blackhill Koppies

His hiking companion, a tortoise.

Tortoise
Tortoise

From a cave on Table Mountain looking down to the City Centre.

City Centre from Table Mountain
City Centre from Table Mountain

We returned to Smitswinkel Bay making it all the way down to the beach this time.
Purple Senecio elegans with its petticoat at the base, Senecio arenarius no petticoat. Yellow Senecio hastatus. Tetragonia fruticosa succulent vygie which sprawls with yellow and red flower spikes.

Yellow berries on Maytenus acuminata (gently break a leaf and pull the halves apart - latex threads) Stream flowing down to the sea - 'It was called Patience after the tiny stream because mariners wanting to fill their water casks here had to be very patient because of the slow trickle of water'. Berzelia lanuginosa with friends to lunch. Swamp daisy Osmitopsis astericoides.

Violet-blue Geissorhiza aspera. Softest pink spikes of Cyphia bulbosa. Soft shrublet cherry buds to white daisy Arctotis aspera. Blue hearted annual Felicia heterophylla.

Thesium viridifolium furry white stars. Fumitory in the poppy family Cysticapnos vesicaria. Fresh anise smell from Agathosma ciliaris. Silene undulata (carnation family)

Smitswinkel Bay flowers in September
Smitswinkel Bay in September

Leucadendron macowanii endemic only to this slope above Smitswinkel Bay. Yellow Moraea fugax, purple outlined yellow nectar guides Moraea tripetala, and white Moraea tricuspidata

Baeometra uniflora beetle lily for the spots. The beach all for us! Where I found an October reminder of breast cancer awareness, perfectly shaped pink stone of Graafwater Formation Malmesbury shale. Huge Pauridia capensis (my thumbnail for scale). Lemon Pterygodium catholicum (orchid).

Romulea hirsuta its golden cup etched with purple. Cream and wine Crassula fascicularis. Gladiolus cunonius with a spoon-shaped upper petal. Velvety red Hyobanche sanguinea.

Pink and red Lessertia capensis with pinnate leaves. Yellow Cineraria geifolia with kidney-shaped leaves.

Smitswinkel Bay flowers in September
Smitswinkel Bay in September

We hike with U3A each week.

I invite you to join us at Elephant's Eye on False Bay. Please subscribe as you prefer
via Feedly,
or Bloglovin,
or Facebook 

Pictures by Diana and Jürg Studer

Teal blue text is my links.
To read comments if you are in email or a Reader,

Thanks for comments that add value. Maybe start a new thread of discussion? BTW your comment won't appear until I've read it. No Google account? Just use Anonymous, but do leave a link to your own blog. I would return the visit, if I could...

I welcome comments on posts from the last 2 months.

Comments

  1. A (short-snout) elephant's eye at Blackhill Koppies?

    ReplyDelete
  2. There seems to be an endless supply of beautiful blooms in your part of the world. I'm trying to abandon envy and just enjoy them. The Moraea and Pelargoniums are exquisite.

    ReplyDelete
  3. The views and blooms in your journeys always fascinate me.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Astonishing landscapes and gorgeous flowers! you are very lucky to live in such beautiful place.

    ReplyDelete
  5. It's good to read about a successful reintroduction of Moraea aristata . I am always astounded about the number of wild flowers that you find. The rocks and views from
    Blackhill Koppies, it must have been a challenge having an accident there. Sarah x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She was able to walk the short distance to the car. Luckily they weren't far away.

      Delete
  6. Bizarre flowers! There is nothing around here that compares to that. Really amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  7. That's encouraging that the Moraea is back--it's lovely! You take the most interesting hikes and find the most incredible wildflowers! If I'm ever in S. Africa, I'd hope to see some of these. Many are plants I've never heard of before. You're so fortunate to have stunning wildflowers year-round!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Even across the worst few weeks of summer heat, we always have something in flower. Quite different to you - and yet - South Africa is lurching from record breaking over 40Cs inland to snow in the Drakensberg - in one week!
      Midday at Constantiaberg weather station nearest to us went from 32C yesterday to 12C today.

      Delete
  8. Came back several times to look at all the fabulous flowers. Enchanting, indeed, the Pelargonium triste and all the rest.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Since we don't get around much, I enjoy traveling through seeing others' photos. This was an awesome experience! I love all of your blooms and scenery! I am glad the one in danger is doing better.

    ReplyDelete
  10. What a lovely and informative post, Diana... look forward to seeing more in the future!

    ReplyDelete
  11. You have the most beautiful flowers there. xo Laura

    ReplyDelete

Popular Posts